Mar 3, 2017

In The Interest Of Justice | Eberechi Okoh


  
“…visiting the sin of counsel on his client is not permitted by the law courts. What is not however tolerated is where a counsel committed all unforgivable a fundamental blunder which affects his case, such as filing a wrong or an incompetent originating process, there is no way the court can blind its eyes to allow the process have its way, as such.” Okpe v. Fan Milk Plc & Anor [2017] 2 NWLR (PT 1549) 310-311

On this note, the Supreme Court gavelled the case to rest. The Appellants in the case cited above had urged the Supreme court to set aside the judgment of the Court of Appeal given in favour of the Respondents on the ground that it was predicated on a Notice of Appeal which did not state the Respondent counsel’s name but bore only the name of the law firm. The 1st Respondent on its part argued that neither the parties nor the Court of Appeal was misled by the content of the Notice of Appeal and urged the Supreme Court to consider what was in the interest of justice in determining the issue. The Supreme Court allowed the appeal and set aside the judgment of the Court of Appeal. Clearly, the Justices had a definition of “justice” different from what counsel to the 1st respondent had envisaged. For them, justice was a three-way traffic - justice to the plaintiff/appellants, the defendants/respondents and the court itself. This is a stance which counsel are all too familiar with.

It remains that lawyers and non-lawyers will always disagree on what constitutes justice. While non-lawyers see justice to be served by simply considering the facts and rewarding the deserving party, lawyers consider procedural correctness which means that proceedings, no matter how well conducted, will amount to a nullity if there is a breach of a cardinal rule of procedure. In the words of Lord Denning “You cannot put something on nothing and expect it to stand”.

The real question becomes, not whether the interest of justice is the highest consideration, but what constitutes justice in each case. In the case of Odom v. PDP [2015] 6 N.W.L.R (PT 1456) 527, the Supreme Court emphasized that the attitude of the Supreme Court is that whenever it is possible to determine a case on the merit, the court will do so by refusing to cling to technicalities. Consequently, litigants can expect that procedures and technicalities are not so sacred as to upturn perceived justice all the time. However, prudent counsel will ensure that their clients are not left hanging in the balance or at the mercy of the Judge’s decision on how a procedural error will be treated. Counsel must pay close attention to procedural matters, in the interest of justice



Senior Associate at Streamsowers & Kohn
Ed’s Note – This article was originally posted here


Share:

0 comments:

Post a Comment

Follow by Email

The Nigerian blawg

We are a law blog dedicated to educating Nigerians on their legal rights, duties and obligations under the law.

Join us in our bid to promote the Rule of Law in Nigeria by sharing our articles with your network. Legal practitioners can also contribute articles by sending a mail to legalnaija@gmail.com

Disclaimer:- Posts and comments by the publishers of this blog do not constitute legal advice or create an attorney-client relationship.

Blog Archive

Higher Study Nigeria

ORDER ON 08055424566

CONTACT US

Name

Email *

Message *

Powered by Blogger.