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Jul 31, 2012

CODE OF CONDUCT FOR PUBLIC OFFICERS


Part 1, of The fifth schedule in the Nigerian Constitution provides for the code of conduct of public officers, though many public officers in Nigeria have flagrantly disregarded these provisions, the common Nigerian doesn’t know when the law has been flouted by these unscrupulous public officers.

The aim of this article, is to shine light on the high standards by which our public officers must live and to allow you be the judge in determining whether our leaders/public officers are indeed leading by example, especially

Jul 27, 2012

PUPILLAGE (PART 3)

Success Without Pupillage And Failure In Spite Of It
27. Young lawyers who succeed without pupillage and those who fail in spite of it do so for the same reasons: the will to succeed or the lack of it. Those who have such will and also undergo pupillage become much more successful. Those who lack it will be unable to take advantage of the benefits of pupillage and when they eventually become independent, the signs of a successful pupillage will be lacking.

28. Strictly speaking, the pupillage that I envisage is not just apprenticeship but also discipleship. That is why I have recommended that the law firms that will be qualified to engage pupil-counsel must be selected by the Nigerian Bar Association. It cannot be open to all. Similarly, the process of pupillage cannot also be open to all

PUPILLAGE: (PART 2)

What is Pupillage?
15. I use the term ‘pupillage’ rather loosely to refer to the period of a lawyer’s career in Nigeria, which is expected to be spent learning the ropes or cutting one’s teeth under the supervision of a pupil-master. This period need not be compelled by law but ought to be structured by the Nigerian Bar Association and made attractive for the young lawyer to voluntarily enrol in. I do not have in mind the type of apprenticeship programme practised in the United Kingdom which is made compulsory for the furtherance of one’s practice career. I do not also have in mind a period of compulsory work employment before one begins an independent legal practise.

16. The type of pupillage that I am recommending is a period of paid apprenticeship during which the pupil counsel learns what was not and cannot be taught at the law faculty

PUPILLAGE (PART 1)

Paper delivered on Tuesday 24th July, 2012 at the Nigerian Bar Association (NBA) Ikeja Branch Young Lawyers’ Forum Seminar

By:

O. A. R. Ogunde Esq.
Senior Advocate of Nigeria and Attorney-General, Ogun State
Principal Counsel, Wemimo Ogunde & Co (on leave of absence)
(Former Chairman, NBA Ikeja Branch Young Lawyers’ Empowerment Committee)


Introduction
1. A lawyer, upon being called to Bar in Nigeria, can immediately begin to practise independently. This has been the case from the time Nigerian citizens became eligible to practise in Nigerian courts. It is therefore common to see many of the eminent lawyers in Nigeria who were called in the 1930s up till the 1960s not to have had any apprenticeship or employment before setting up their law firms.

Jul 23, 2012

NIGERIAN TAX LAWS


Taxation of persons and businesses is a means through which government raises revenue to finance its programmes and meet its obligations to its citizens. Such taxes include property tax. In Nigeria, where property is acquired or transferred, the parties are required under the vaious tax regimes to pay taxes to the government.
Similarly,rent accuring to individuals and companies on properties is regarded as income and accordingly taxed.   Tax is a compulsory charge by the Government on the income of an individual,corporarion, or trust, as well as value of an estate or gift. It could also be described as a levy imposed by an organ of government for public purposes. Taxes are either direct or indirect levies.